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Movers by Meaghan McIssaac

Review by Ellen

Movers imageThis is a thoroughly intriguing book. Set around 60 years in the future, the world is faced by a new phenomenon, time travel. People can’t nip around wherever they fancy and the ability is restricted to those born with the talented, Movers. And they are not looked upon kindly by the Non-Movers, to say the least.

Movers are connected to someone in a random future year, known as their Shadow. Depending on their strength Movers can feel their Shadow in their mind, converse with them or even, for the very strongest, move them back down the years or centuries to the present day. But in an immigration style theme, Non-Movers claim the Shadows are taking their jobs, space and quality of life so Moving is strictly forbidden and even more strictly policed.

The story follows Patrick Mermick, a registered Phase 1 Mover and his younger sister, Maggie. Our first glimpse into their lives is in 2077 when their father is arrested for Moving and effectively made to disappear. Pat, his mother and baby Maggie are left behind but can do nothing to save him. Fast forward six years and life is continuing relatively smoothly. Pat completes the monthly Mover registration forms without difficulty. At just Phase 1 he is not a priority but his classmate, Gabby, is not so lucky. As a Phase 2 Mover, capable of talking to her Shadow, she is both feared and shunned by her peers. Pat’s routine of daily life is shattered when he and Gabby become implicated after a Move at their tower block school, which brings a dangerous man back into the past. They are forced to go on the run, taking little Maggie with them.

This book had me gripped from beginning to end. The story developed at a rapid pace with new unpredictable yet believable developments throughout making it a definite page turner. I can see McIsaac’s world in my head as though it were a real place and time. Movers is a must read and I will certainly be looking out for more of McIsaac’s work.

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